Down the tbr hole

-| Down The TBR Hole #14 |-

So here we are with another instalment of Down the TBR hole this was originally created by Lost In A Story The idea is to help slim down your Goodreads TBR, because we all know how large and endless that list becomes! 

|| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 |13||

If you have read my previous posts you will know that I’m usually pretty harsh, getting rid of at least half of the 10 books I pick.
Let’s see if today is any different…

Eight Million Ways to Die by Lawrence Block and Illustrated by John K. Snyder

In crime-ravaged 1980s New York, a troubled ex-cop turned unlicensed detective takes on his most dangerous case, hunting down a serial killer-hitman, and ultimately coming face-to-face with his deadliest enemy, himself, in this graphic novel adaptation of the book by Lawrence Block.
Matthew Scudder is dying, one bottle at a time. A young prostitute named Kim Dakkinen is dying too, her life measured out in tricks. She wanted out, had asked for Scudder’s help, but suddenly she wasn’t dying anymore, she was just dead. The former cop turned P.I. promised to protect her, but he failed. Now his atonement is to find her killer. But the secrets in the dead hooker’s past are dirtier than her living, and searching for a killer in a city where everyone’s a victim is a good way to make the role permanent.
Steeped in traditional pulp, Block’s writing has a true gift for capturing the art of conversation between his characters. These are the lowlifes of society, for whom Block occasionally finds redemption, but who are more often among the vilest beings in human existence. Snyder’s art both encapsulates and elevates these rough-cut gems in a graphic, grainy, and moody setting that evokes the dark, noir magazine covers of the period.

I don’t think that I would enjoy the art style in this and the synopsis just doesn’t excite me.

One Way (Frank Kittridge #1) by S.J. Morden

It’s the dawn of a new era – and we’re ready to colonise Mars. But the company that’s been contracted to construct a new Mars base, has made promises they can’t fulfil and is desperate enough to cut corners. The first thing to go is the automation . . . the next thing they’ll have to deal with is the eight astronauts they’ll send to Mars, when there aren’t supposed to be any at all.
Frank – father, architect, murderer – is recruited for the mission to Mars with the promise of a better life, along with seven of his most notorious fellow inmates. But as his crew sets to work on the red wasteland of Mars, the accidents mount up, and Frank begins to suspect they might not be accidents at all. As the list of suspect grows shorter, it’s up to Frank to uncover the terrible truth before it’s too late.

I don’t actually remember every seeing this book or adding it to my TBR but after reading the synopsis I’m definitely interested in reading it.

Noumenon (Noumenon #1) by Marina J. Lostetter

In 2088, humankind is at last ready to explore beyond Earth’s solar system. But one uncertainty remains: Where do we go?
Astrophysicist Reggie Straifer has an idea. He’s discovered an anomalous star that appears to defy the laws of physics, and proposes the creation of a deep-space mission to find out whether the star is a weird natural phenomenon, or something manufactured.
The journey will take eons. In order to maintain the genetic talent of the original crew, humankind’s greatest ambition—to explore the furthest reaches of the galaxy—is undertaken by clones. But a clone is not a perfect copy, and each new generation has its own quirks, desires, and neuroses. As the centuries fly by, the society living aboard the nine ships (designated “Convoy Seven”) changes and evolves, but their mission remains the same: to reach Reggie’s mysterious star and explore its origins—and implications.

Again I don’t remember adding this to my TBR pile, after reading about it I don’t think it’s something that I would be interested in reading.

A Time to Die (Out of Time #1) by Nadine Brandes

How would you live if you knew the day you’d die?
Parvin Blackwater has wasted her life. At only seventeen, she has one year left according to the Clock by her bedside.
In a last-ditch effort to make a difference, she tries to rescue Radicals from the crooked justice system. But when the authorities find out about her illegal activity, they cast her through the Wall — her people’s death sentence.
What she finds on the other side about the world, about eternity, and about herself changes Parvin forever and might just save her people. But her Clock is running out.

Knowing the day you die is a really interesting concept which I’ve actually thought about a few times. I hope this is as interesting as it sounds.

Jane Doe (Jane Doe #1) by Victoria Helen Stone

A double life with a single purpose: revenge.
Jane’s days at a Midwest insurance company are perfectly ordinary. She blends in well, unremarkably pretty in her floral-print dresses and extra efficient at her low-level job. She’s just the kind of woman middle manager Steven Hepsworth likes—meek, insecure, and willing to defer to a man. No one has any idea who Jane really is. Least of all Steven.
But plain Jane is hiding something. And Steven’s bringing out the worst in her.
Nothing can distract Jane from going straight for his heart: allowing herself to be seduced into Steven’s bed, to insinuate herself into his career and his family, and to expose all his dirty secrets. It’s time for Jane to dig out everything that matters to Steven. So she can take it all away.
Just as he did to her. 

This has definitely piqued my interest!

The Stranger Upstairs by Melanie Raabe

He calls himself your husband. But you’re the only one who knows the truth.
Several years ago, your husband, and the father of your young son, disappeared. Since then, you’ve dreamt of his return; railed against him for leaving you alone; grieved for your marriage; and, finally, vowed to move on.
One morning, the phone rings. When you answer, a voice at the other end tells you your husband’s on a plane bound for home, and that you’ll see him tomorrow. You’ve imagined this reunion countless times. Of course you have. But nothing has prepared you for the reality. For the moment you realise you don’t know this man.
Because he isn’t your husband; he’s a complete stranger — and he’s coming home with you. Even worse, he seems to know about something very bad you once did — something no one else could possibly know about . . . Could they?

I believe that I did start to read this and I got about 20% in but I just couldn’t get into the book and didn’t feel like I wanted to carry on.

The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick

It’s America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war—and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.
This harrowing, Hugo Award-winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to wake.

I have recently hauled this edition and plan on getting to it in the near future!

Feed (Newsflesh #1) by Mira Grant

The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beaten the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop.
The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED. Now, twenty years after the Rising, bloggers Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives—the dark conspiracy behind the infected.
The truth will get out, even if it kills them.

I absolutely loved Into The Drowning Deep by Mira Grant which is actually Seanan McGuire so I would happily read more by her under this pen name.

Tell No One by Harlan Coben

For Dr. David Beck, the loss was shattering. And every day for the past eight years, he has relived the horror of what happened. The gleaming lake. The pale moonlight. The piercing screams. The night his wife was taken. The last night he saw her alive.
Everyone tells him it’s time to move on, to forget the past once and for all. But for David Beck, there can be no closure. A message has appeared on his computer, a phrase only he and his dead wife know. Suddenly Beck is taunted with the impossible — that somewhere, somehow, Elizabeth is alive.
Beck has been warned to tell no one. And he doesn’t. Instead, he runs from the people he trusts the most, plunging headlong into a search for the shadowy figure whose messages hold out a desperate hope.
But already Beck is being hunted down. He’s headed straight into the heart of a dark and deadly secret — and someone intends to stop him before he gets there. 

I feel like Harlan Coben is becoming the next James Patterson as he is constantly publishing books which actually puts me off reading books by him, not sure if that’s just me.

The Silence of the Lambs (Hannibal Lecter #2) by Thomas Harris

A serial murderer known only by a grotesquely apt nickname—Buffalo Bill—is stalking women. He has a purpose, but no one can fathom it, for the bodies are discovered in different states. Clarice Starling, a young trainee at the FBI Academy, is surprised to be summoned by Jack Crawford, chief of the Bureau’s Behavioral Science section. Her assignment: to interview Dr. Hannibal Lecter—Hannibal the Cannibal—who is kept under close watch in the Baltimore State Hospital for the Criminally Insane.
Dr. Lecter is a former psychiatrist with a grisly history, unusual tastes, and an intense curiosity about the darker corners of the mind. His intimate understanding of the killer and of Clarice herself form the core of The Silence of the Lambs—an ingenious, masterfully written book and an unforgettable classic of suspense fiction.

I’ve read the first book in this series and I will definitely be getting to The Silence of the Lambs this year.

Today I said goodbye to:  4 out of 10 Books (the least that I have ever binned!)
Overall I’ve removed: 76 out of 140

See you in the next one…

5 thoughts on “-| Down The TBR Hole #14 |-”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s