Down the tbr hole

-| Down The TBR Hole #10 |-

So here we are with another instalment of Down the TBR hole this was originally created by Lost In A Story The idea is to help slim down your Goodreads TBR, because we all know how large and endless that list becomes! 

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If you have read my previous posts you will know that I’m usually pretty harsh, getting rid of at least half of the 10 books I pick.
Let’s see if today is any different…

Don’t Let Go by Michel Bussi


Picture the scene – an idyllic resort on the island of Réunion. Martial and Liane Bellion are enjoying the perfect moment with their six-year-old daughter. Turquoise skies, clear water, palm trees, a warm breeze…
Then Liane Bellion disappears. She went up to her hotel room between 3 and 4pm and never came back. When the room is opened, it is empty, but there is blood everywhere. An employee of the hotel claims to have seen Martial in the corridor during that crucial hour.
Then Martial also disappears, along with his daughter. An all-out manhunt is declared across the island. But is Martial really his wife’s killer?
And if he isn’t, why does he appear to be so guilty? 

This does sound like it could be intriguing and if I came across I would definitely give it a go.

Epidemic: America’s Trade in Child Rape by Lori Handrahan


The problem of child sex abuse and its cover-up is real.
A generation of American children are being destroyed.
If you think this happens to someone else’s children and your children are safe, you are mistaken. Your children might be enduring sexual abuse right now while you remain dangerously ignorant.
America’s appetite for child pornography puts all our children at risk. Your children and mine. Whether you acknowledge it or not.
This book is a wake-up call about a subject too few people want to discuss.
That is, while no one was watching, America has become a child pornography nation.

These topics are so important for people to become aware of! I really need to get to this at some point soon, it will be very difficult read but we can’t keep burying our heads in the sand.

This Is How It Begins by Joan Dempsey

In 2009, eighty-five-year-old art professor Ludka Zeilonka gets drawn into a political firestorm when her grandson, Tommy, is among a group of gay Massachusetts teachers fired for allegedly discriminating against Christian kids in high school classrooms. The ensuing battle to reinstate the teachers raises the spectre of Ludka’s World War II past — a past she’s spent a lifetime trying to forget.
The firings are the brainchild of Warren Meck, a deeply religious local radio host and father of three who is hoping to pass a religious freedom bill in Massachusetts. Meck favours achieving his goals through careful planning and legislation, and is disturbed when violence erupts. His concern quickly turns to alarm when he realises those within his inner circle might be inciting the violence.
As Ludka’s esteemed political family defends Tommy under increasingly vicious conditions, a stranger with connections to Ludka’s past shows up and threatens to expose her for illegally hoarding a valuable painting presumed stolen by the Nazis. Only one other person knew about the painting — a man she’s been trying to find for sixty years.

I don’t remember ever adding this and I won’t be reading it.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris


The incredible story of the Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist and the woman he loved.
Lale Sokolov is well-dressed, a charmer, a ladies’ man. He is also a Jew. On the first transport from Slovakia to Auschwitz in 1942, Lale immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners.
In the camp, he is looked up to, looked out for, and put to work in the privileged position of Tätowierer– the tattooist – to mark his fellow prisoners, forever. One of them is a young woman, Gita, who steals his heart at first glance.
His life given new purpose, Lale does his best through the struggle and suffering to use his position for good.

I remember adding this purely for the fact that it is during Auschwitz, however, I can’t seem to connect with historical fiction and I’ve heard mixed reviews.

Mine by J.L. Butler

Set in the Inns of Court in London, where justice and corruption go hand in hand. J L Butler’s taut, gripping legal drama brims with suspense and obsession, and only you can solve the case…
Francine Day is a high-flying lawyer about to apply for silk, ambitious and brilliant. She just needs one headline grabbing client to seal her place as Queen’s Counsel… Martin Joy. The attraction is instant. Obsessive.
They embark on a secret affair and Francine thinks she can hold it together. But then Martin’s wife, Donna, goes missing. And Martin is the prime suspect.
As the case unravels so does Francine, because the last person to see Donna Joy alive, was her. My client. My lover. My husband. My obsession.

This has peeked my interest so I’m happy to keep it on my TBR for now.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned the house down.
In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is meticulously planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colours of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.
Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenage daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than just tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the alluring mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past, and a disregard for the rules that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.
When the Richardsons’ friends attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town and puts Mia and Mrs. Richardson on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Mrs. Richardson becomes determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs to her own family – and Mia’s.

I’m not a massive fan of adult contemporary, especially based around neighbours so I just don’t think I will enjoy it.

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

No one’s ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine.
Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.
But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

I can’t remember why I added this but I don’t have any intention of reading it.

The Last Mile (Amos Decker #2) by David Baldacci

Memories can be a real killer.
Melvin Mars awaits his fate on Death Row. He was one of America’s most promising football stars until, aged twenty, he was arrested and convicted for the murder of his parents just as he was due to begin a very lucrative contract with the NFL.
When Amos Decker, newly appointed special agent with the FBI, hears the news that Melvin was saved in the final seconds before his execution because someone has confessed to the killings, he persuades his boss to allow him to carry out an investigation into the Mars murders.
There are facts about the case which don’t add up, and as the investigation deepens, Decker and his team uncover layer upon layer of lies and deception which are rooted at a time in American history which most would rather forget, but some seem keen to remember.
There is someone out there with a lot to hide, and a secret that everyone is looking for. A race against time ensues because, when revealed, that information threatens to tear apart the corridors of power at the very highest level.
The case proves to be life-changing for both Mars and Decker in ways that neither could ever have imagined.

I’ve had this on my bookcase for ages and I really want to read it, however I just keep forgetting about it.

The Kept Woman (Will Trent #8) by Karin Slaughter

Husbands and wives. Mothers and daughters. The past and the future. Secrets bind them. And secrets can destroy them.
The author of Pretty Girls returns with an electrifying, emotionally complex thriller that plunges its fascinating protagonist into the darkest depths of a mystery that just might destroy him.
With the discovery of a murder at an abandoned construction site, Will Trent of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation is brought in on a case that becomes much more dangerous when the dead man is identified as an ex-cop.
Studying the body, Sara Linton—the GBI’s newest medical examiner and Will’s lover—realises that the extensive blood loss didn’t belong to the corpse. Sure enough, bloody footprints leading away from the scene indicate there is another victim—a woman—who has vanished . . . and who will die soon if she isn’t found.

I’ve never read anything by Karin Slaughter but I’ve heard pretty good things. However, I’m removing this one as it’s #8 in a series that I haven’t even planned on starting.

Just Before I Died by S.K. Tremayne

Why did you do that to me Mummy, don’t you love me?
Kath lives with her husband Adam and daughter Lyla in a desolate stone longhouse deep in Dartmoor National Park. She likes her life the moors are beautiful, if bleak and she counts herself as happy, even if they struggle with money, and work, and her daughter’s shyness.
But one day Kath wakes up from a coma, with a vague memory of a near-fatal car accident. She hugs her daughter close, likewise her husband Adam. But there’s something wrong. Adam seems furious with her and Lyla is acting evermore strangely. They should be delighted to see her alive, snatched from certain death. But they won’t meet her gaze.
Then Kath learns that the car crash wasn’t an accident, and her whole life collapses into a world of panic, and danger.

Just from looking at the cover I thought that I would be saying goodbye to this book, however the last sentence in the synopsis made me really want to give it a go.

Today I said goodbye to:  5 out of 10 Books
Overall I’ve removed: 55 out of 100 (Damn!)

See you in the next one…

11 thoughts on “-| Down The TBR Hole #10 |-”

  1. I haven’t heard of a few of these. I have read The Tattooist Of Auschwitz and thought it was really good though. I also really want to read a Karin Slaughter book sometime but I think I’m probably going to start off with Pretty Girls. And I’m pretty sure I have several books by the last author on this list on my TBR too. I hope you enjoy the books that you’ve kept when you get around to reading them

    Liked by 1 person

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